Pond Visitors

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One of the great things about having a garden pond is that frogs get to know you and lose their fear of a camera lens. I'd never be able to get inches away from a frog in the wild but those in our yard just sit there and ignore me.

dining frog

Here are some of the creatures we share our pond with.

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We have a new camera that really does a great job capturing the details in each frog.

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Here's another photo of the previous frog. He's so used to us he'll sit pose for me all day.

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This guy has a dark body and beautiful bright green face.

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Every spring we seem to find a newt or two. This one was a much more colorful than another type we've also seen.

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This photo shows the beautiful markings on this visitor.

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These dragonfly nymphs live in the roots of floating plants. Take care when you remove plants in the fall to give them a chance to re-enter the pond.

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This frog has beautiful markings across his back and legs.

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It's so much fun taking photos of these guys who just sit there and ignore me.

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Look carefully at your floating plant roots in the fall to find these dragonfly "youngsters".

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This guy was enjoying some sun on the side of our pond.

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We were quite surprised to see this snapper turtle stopped by for a swim.

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We took him out for a photo opportunity and boy was this guy mean!  He was then safely relocated.

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A close-up of a dragonfly nymph.  We can often find them in the roots of our floating plants.

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This is one of my favorite photos.  Hard to eat your food when it sits on the back of your head!

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This is a new friend that showed one day.  I always enjoy those that will pose for my camera.

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A close up of one of our frog friends.

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A face only his mother could love.

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It's always fun to see what we can find in the pond.

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This is a nice photo of these wonderful brown dragonflies.  They are not as common as our other visitors but always worth a close look.

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This pond visitor clearly did not play well with others.  We later captured him and transported him to a new location.

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A neat photo of these very colorful dragonflies.  This one spent a long time resting on the wingtip of our dragonfly sculpture.

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This frog loves to spend time out of the water and was always willing to let me stick my camera in his face.

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This is my favorite of the pond visitor photos for 2000.  Two of these guys are real, the other is made of concrete.

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I had to lay on the ground to get this camera angle.

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